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{{Infobox Book|List={{{1|}}}|GetValue={{{GetValue|}}}
 
{{Infobox Book|List={{{1|}}}|GetValue={{{GetValue|}}}
 
| booktype = Book (Orange)
 
| booktype = Book (Orange)
| returnpage = Ankrahmun Libraries
 
 
| title = Year 10 in the reign of Harrah II
 
| title = Year 10 in the reign of Harrah II
| relatedpages =
 
| location = [[Great Pyramid]]
 
 
| pagename = Crime and Punishment Under Harrah II (Book)
 
| pagename = Crime and Punishment Under Harrah II (Book)
  +
| location = [[Great Pyramid]]
 
| blurb = A series of stories about law-breakers and how they were punished.
 
| blurb = A series of stories about law-breakers and how they were punished.
  +
| author = ?
  +
| returnpage = Ankrahmun Libraries
 
| text = Year 10 in the reign of Harrah II<br>The baker Thahon claimed that the wife of the merchant Habthi was guilty of witchcraft. Thahon could not bring forth convincing proof of her guilt and was sentenced to ten blows on his bare feet. The crafter Ziril claimed that the beggar Aukohl stole a cake from his open window. Although no proof was found there was a general sense of agreement that no proof was necessary since everybody was convinced of the beggar's guilt. In a rare display of mercy the judge sentenced him to a mere three years of work in the salt mines. The widow Zehmahil claimed that the travelling bard Todd Ballory had promised here mariage in exchange for certain services that have not been further elaborated on in the court's documents. The foreigner was found guilty without trial and sentenced to three years of work in the salt mines. The footsoldier Kamahl claimed his father Indril was guilty of witchcraft. Several obscure texts were found beneath the accused person's bed. Indril was banished from the city and his property was equally divided between the pharaoh and his heirs. The foreigner Todd Ballory was pronounced guilty of killing the overseer Barnak, a father of sixteen children and a respectable member of the local whipcrackers' association. The aforementioned convict was sentenced to a rather spectacular final appearance in the local arena.
 
| text = Year 10 in the reign of Harrah II<br>The baker Thahon claimed that the wife of the merchant Habthi was guilty of witchcraft. Thahon could not bring forth convincing proof of her guilt and was sentenced to ten blows on his bare feet. The crafter Ziril claimed that the beggar Aukohl stole a cake from his open window. Although no proof was found there was a general sense of agreement that no proof was necessary since everybody was convinced of the beggar's guilt. In a rare display of mercy the judge sentenced him to a mere three years of work in the salt mines. The widow Zehmahil claimed that the travelling bard Todd Ballory had promised here mariage in exchange for certain services that have not been further elaborated on in the court's documents. The foreigner was found guilty without trial and sentenced to three years of work in the salt mines. The footsoldier Kamahl claimed his father Indril was guilty of witchcraft. Several obscure texts were found beneath the accused person's bed. Indril was banished from the city and his property was equally divided between the pharaoh and his heirs. The foreigner Todd Ballory was pronounced guilty of killing the overseer Barnak, a father of sixteen children and a respectable member of the local whipcrackers' association. The aforementioned convict was sentenced to a rather spectacular final appearance in the local arena.
  +
| implemented = ?
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 12:58, May 4, 2019


Notes

This book has no notes.


Year 10 in the reign of Harrah II
The baker Thahon claimed that the wife of the merchant Habthi was guilty of witchcraft. Thahon could not bring forth convincing proof of her guilt and was sentenced to ten blows on his bare feet. The crafter Ziril claimed that the beggar Aukohl stole a cake from his open window. Although no proof was found there was a general sense of agreement that no proof was necessary since everybody was convinced of the beggar's guilt. In a rare display of mercy the judge sentenced him to a mere three years of work in the salt mines. The widow Zehmahil claimed that the travelling bard Todd Ballory had promised here mariage in exchange for certain services that have not been further elaborated on in the court's documents. The foreigner was found guilty without trial and sentenced to three years of work in the salt mines. The footsoldier Kamahl claimed his father Indril was guilty of witchcraft. Several obscure texts were found beneath the accused person's bed. Indril was banished from the city and his property was equally divided between the pharaoh and his heirs. The foreigner Todd Ballory was pronounced guilty of killing the overseer Barnak, a father of sixteen children and a respectable member of the local whipcrackers' association. The aforementioned convict was sentenced to a rather spectacular final appearance in the local arena.

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